Tag: PHP

Creating Exception types on-the-fly in modern PHP

We pioneered a pattern for exception handling for Zend Framework back as we initially began development on version 2 around seven years ago. The pattern looks like this:

  • We would create a marker ExceptionInterface for each package.
  • We would extend SPL exceptions and implement the package marker interface when doing so.

What this gave users was the ability to catch in three ways:

  • They could catch the most specific exception type by class name.
  • They could catch all package-level exceptions using the marker interface.
  • The could catch general exceptions using the associated SPL type.

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Fixing Redis background-save issues on Docker

I've been running redis in Docker for a number of sites, to perform things such as storing session data, hubot settings, and more.

I recently ran into a problem on one of my systems where it was reporting:

Can't save in background: fork: Out of memory

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Building a usable ext-tidy for Alpine-based PHP Docker images

I've been working on building PHP Docker images for the purposes of testing, as well as to potentially provide images containing the Swoole extension. This is generally straight-forward, as the official PHP images are well-documented.

This week, I decided to see if I could build Alpine-based images, as they can greatly reduce the final image size. And I ran into a problem.

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The Future of Zend Framework

For the past thirteen years, I've been either consuming Zend Framework or directly contributing to it. Since 2009, I've operated as project lead, and, since then, shepherded the version 2 and 3 releases, added Apigility to the ZF ecosystem, and helped bring middleware paradigms to the mainstream by assisting with the creation of Stratigility and coordination of the Expressive project. As I write this, the various ZF packages have been downloaded over 300 MILLION times, with 200 million of those being in the past 18 months!

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Async Expressive with Swoole

Have you used Node.js?

For those of my readers unfamiliar with Node.js, it's a server-side JavaScript framework that provides the ability to create, among other things, network services. To do so, it provides an event loop, which allows for such things as asynchronous processing.

In the PHP ecosystem, a group of Chinese developers have been creating an extension that provides many of the same capabilities as Node.js. This extension, called Swoole, allows you to create web servers with asynchronous capabilities. In many cases, the asynchronous capabilities are handled via coroutines, allowing you to write normal, synchronous code that still benefits from the asynchronous nature of the system event loop, allowing your server to continue responding to new requests as they come in!

We've been gradually adding and refining our Swoole support in Expressive, and recently issued a stable release that will work with any PSR-15 request handler. In this post, I'll enumerate what I feel are the reasons for considering Swoole when deploying your PHP middleware application.

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Notes on GraphQL

The last week has been my first foray into GraphQL, using the GitHub GraphQL API endpoints. I now have OpinionsTM.

The promise is fantastic: query for everything you need, but nothing more. Get it all in one go.

But the reality is somewhat... different.

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PSR-15

Yesterday, following a unanimous vote from its Core Committee, PHP-FIG formally accepted the proposed PSR-15, HTTP Server Handlers standard.

This new standard defines interfaces for request handlers and middleware. These have enormous potential impact on the PHP ecosystem, as they provide standard mechanisms for writing HTTP-facing, server-side applications. Essentially, they pave the way for developers to create re-usable web components that will work in any application that works with PSR-15 middleware or request handlers!

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Using Anonymous Classes to Write Middleware

I faced an interesting question recently with regards to middleware: What happens when we go from a convention-based to a contract-based approach when programming?

Convention-based approaches usually allow for duck-typing; with middleware, it means you can write PHP callables — usually closures — and just expect them to work.

Contract-based approaches use interfaces. I think you can see where this is going.

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PSR-7 Request and Method Utilities

We all know the standard HTTP request methods and status codes, right? Or do we?

We definitely know whether or not they should be integers or strings, and/or how string values should be normalized, right?

And our IDEs can totally autocomplete them, right?

Oh, that's not the case?

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Automating PHPUnit with Node

I've been trying to automate everything this year. When working on OSS, this is usually as simple as setting up Travis CI; in some cases, even that becomes a little more involved, but remains possible.

But that's continuous integration. What about continuous development?

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