Tag: psr-7

Using Anonymous Classes to Write Middleware

I faced an interesting question recently with regards to middleware: What happens when we go from a convention-based to a contract-based approach when programming?

Convention-based approaches usually allow for duck-typing; with middleware, it means you can write PHP callables — usually closures — and just expect them to work.

Contract-based approaches use interfaces. I think you can see where this is going.

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PSR-7 Request and Method Utilities

We all know the standard HTTP request methods and status codes, right? Or do we?

We definitely know whether or not they should be integers or strings, and/or how string values should be normalized, right?

And our IDEs can totally autocomplete them, right?

Oh, that's not the case?

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Programmatic Expressive

Enrico just returned from phpDay, where he spoke about Expressive and the upcoming Zend Framework 3. One piece of feedback he brought back had to do with how people perceive they should be building Expressive applications: many think, based on our examples, that it's completely configuration driven!

As it turns out, this is far from the truth; we developed our API to mimic that of traditional microframeworks, and then built a configuration layer on top of that to allow making substitutions. However, it's not only possible, but quite fun, to mix and match the two ideas!

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Serve PSR-7 Middleware Via React

I've been intending to play with React for some time, but, for one reason or another, kept putting it off. This past week, I carved some time finally to experiment with it, and, specifically, to determine if serving PSR-7 middleware was possible.

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Expressive 1.0 in the Wild!

A few hours ago, we pushed Expressive 1.0.

This is a huge milestone for the ZF3 initiative; I've even called it the cornerstone. It signals a huge shift in direction for the project, returning to its roots as a component library. Expressive itself, however, also signals the future of PHP applications we envision: composed of layered, single-purpose PSR-7 middleware.

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On PSR7 and HTTP Headers

Yesterday, a question tagged #psr7 on Twitter caught my eye:

#psr7 Request::getHeader($name) return array of single string instead of strings in #Slim3? cc: @codeguy pic.twitter.com/ifA9hCKAPs

@feryardiant (tweet)

The image linked provides the following details:

When I call $request->getHeader('Accept') for example, I was expected that I'll get something like this:

Array(
    [0] => text/html,
    [1] => application/xhtml+xml,
    [2] => application/xml,
)

but, in reallity I got this:

Array(
    [0] => text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,image/webp,*/*;q=0.8
)

Is it correct?

In this post, I'll explain why the behavior observed is correct, as well as shed a light on a few details of header handling in PSR-7.

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PSR-7 Accepted!

I'm pleased to announce that as of 22:00 CDT on 18 May 2015, http://www.php-fig.org/psr/psr-7 PSR-7 (HTTP Message Interfaces) has been accepted!

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PSR-7 By Example

PSR-7 is now accepted!!!

~~I'm still hearing some grumbles both of "simplify!" and "not far enough!" so I'm writing this posts to demonstrate usage of the currently published interfaces, and to illustrate both the ease of use and the completeness and robustness they offer.~~

First, though I want to clarify what PSR-7 is attempting.

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On HTTP, Middleware, and PSR-7

As I've surveyed the successes and failures of ZF1 and ZF2, I've started considering how we can address usability: how do we make the framework more approachable?

One concept I've been researching a ton lately is middleware. Middleware exists in a mature form in Ruby (via Rack), Python (via WSGI), and Node (via Connect / ExpressJS); just about every language has some exemplar. Even PHP has some examples already, in StackPHP and Slim Framework.

The basic concept of middleware can be summed up in a single method signature:

function (request, response) { }

The idea is that objects, hashes, or structs representing the HTTP request and HTTP response are passed to a callable, which does something with them. You compose these in a number of ways to build an application.

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